New Pattern: Pomball Pop

Pomball Pop Hat - use one mini skein and one full skein to get a great slouchy hat with a matching pompom from Imagined Landscapes

It didn’t take long after starting to play around with mini skeins for me to think of the idea that lead to my first pattern collection “Pomballs”. There was a match made in heaven, right? Right.

This hat has lots of subtle details that really please me: the way the two levels of ribbing point at the colourwork lines, the crisp contrast cast-on edge. But let’s be frank: the main bit of attention-stealing fun is that reversed colour pomball!

Pomball Pop Hat - use one mini skein and one full skein to get a great slouchy hat with a matching pompom from Imagined Landscapes

If you’ve never done a pomball before, they’re super simple – just a knitted ball lightly stuffed. But they’re also long-lasting. They’ll stand up well to use and keep coming back for more, which isn’t always true with pompoms.

$5.75 CAD

 

Sizes

  • To fit: 18 (20, 22, 24)” / 46 (51, 56, 61) cm circumference
  • Approximately Child (Small, Medium, Large)

Skills Used
•knit and purl
•knitting in the round
•stranded knitting
•k2tog, ssk
•M1L, M1R

Pomball Pop Hat - use one mini skein and one full skein to get a great slouchy hat with a matching pompom from Imagined Landscapes

Pomball Pop Hat - use one mini skein and one full skein to get a great slouchy hat with a matching pompom from Imagined Landscapes

Materials:

  • Approximate Yardage Fingering Weight: (with a 15% buffer)
    • MC: 163 (192, 240, 282) yds. / 148 (175, 217, 257)m
    • CC: 27 (33, 41, 48) yds. / 25 (30, 27, 44)m
  • darning needle
  • stitch marker
  • small amount of stuffing
  • needles: US 2 – 2.75 mm, US 4 – 3.5 mm, US 000 – 1.5 mm needles for working in the round (magic loop OR short circular + DPNs OR DPNs) or size needed to get gauge

Definitely check out the versions my testers made – lots of great colour inspiration!

Episode 24: Sockpocalypse

Patterns/KALs

  • Urban Creative Exploration results – Wire Whisk-like sculpture aka “Bauble” was the winner, yarn from IndigoDragonfly and patterns from Kristen Jancuk and me to come in fall!
  • Xmas in July KAL: FOs thread now up
  • gnome in testing this week!

Destination Achieved

 

Are We There Yet?  

 

Imaginary knitting

 

Off the Knitted Path 

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Episode 23: Permission to Tink

Patterns/KALs

 

Destination Achieved

 

 

 

Are We There Yet?

 

 

 

 

 

Off the Knitted Path

 

  • Katie:

 

 

What’s in a name: Curvature of the Earth?

a new pattern in the +1 Pop Collection, taking mini skeins to the max. The Curvature of the Earth Cowl is a simple knitting pattern with a huge impact.

Wondering where the name came from? Well, it definitely references the curving, encircling lines of the cowl. I’ve always loved the way that globes’ lines of longitude and latitude swoop tidily over their surface.

But really? It’s a joke about the first version I knit. I went way out of my comfort zone for the colours, picking them in the depths of winter and going for something exciting. I joked that “I’m so far out of my comfort zone that I can’t even see it because of the curvature of the earth!”

Hedgehog Fibers Sock and Sun Valley Fibers yarns

And you know, it was a blast to knit something so unlike my usual projects! Hot pink and neon yellow splatters? Wow, did they wake me up and keep me fascinated in the process of working on this simple cowl.

New Pattern: Curvature of the Earth Cowl

a new pattern in the +1 Pop Collection, taking mini skeins to the max. The Curvature of the Earth Cowl is a simple knitting pattern with a huge impact.


$5.75 CAD individually
or as part of the +1 Pop Collection

The +1 Pop Collection has a new arrival to announce! The Curvature of the Earth Cowl is here, and it’s ready to take the roll of easy poolside or travel knitting.

By knitting on the bias, you’ll get maximum impact from a mini skein and a few garter ridges. There are 3 single stripes and 2 double stripes in the contrast colour, giving you a slightly different look on each side. I know not everyone loves the process of grafting despite it’s smooth beauty, so instructions are given for a three-needle bind off as well as grafting so that you can choose the method you’re most comfortable with.

Easy to modify and make your own.

a new pattern in the +1 Pop Collection, taking mini skeins to the max. The Curvature of the Earth Cowl is a simple knitting pattern with a huge impact. Easy garter stripe details

Skills Used
•knit and purl
•kfb
•k2tog
•provisional cast-on
•grafting or 3-needle bind off

Fingering Weight Yardage (with a 15% buffer)
MC: 437 yd. / 400m
CC: 37 yd. / 33m
This pattern is easy to modify for more or less yardage.

Grey/Green Cowl is Cascade Yarns Heritage Sock ‘5631 Charcoal’, and Sun Valley Fibers MCN ‘Edinburgh’
Splatter/Blue Cowl is Hedgehog Fibres Sock ‘Crybaby’ and Sun Valley Fibers MCN ‘Poolside’

Want help choosing colours? Check out the two tricks in How to Choose Yarn Colour Combos.

Gauge:
after light blocking (soaked and laid flat to dry)
28 sts and 40 rows = 4” / 10cm stockinette

Materials:
•Two US 2.5 / 3mm needles or size needed to get gauge, circular needles recommended to accommodate the stitch count
•darning needle
•crochet hook
•smooth fingering weight yarn for provisional cast-on

We need your input!

vote for the inspiration and light the spark for our collaboration

Do you remember the Prairie Autumn Collaboration Exploration? You picked your favourite of the four autumnal prairie photos, Danie dyed up an amazing yellow colourway, and I designed a self-fringing side-to-side shawl.

Well, the collaboration is back! This time it’s the fearless colourmaven from Ontario: Kim McBrien of Indigo Dragonfly who’ll take the photo and turn it into yarn. To spice things up I’ve also asked Kristen Jancuk of MediaPeruana to design a pattern as well. Creativity loves company!

It wasn’t easy, but we’ve narrowed it down to 4 of our favourite photos of urban landscapes. But now you get to determine the final winner. Vote for your Favourite

Voting closes June 28th. Winning photo will be announced July 2nd. The patterns and yarn will debut at Rhinebeck this autumn. It’s wild, creative, and unpredictable! I can’t wait.

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Episode 22: Think Less, Knit More

Patterns/KALs

Ancyra Cowl - a free knitting pattern on Knitty.com from Imagined Landscapes Designs

 

 

Are We There Yet?  

 

 

 

 

Imaginary knitting

 

On the Knitted Path

 

Off the Knitted Path (non-yarn things)

 

  • Katie:

 

 

  • Sarah:

 

    • Father Brown
      • Other recommendations like this or Midsomer Murders? Gentle yet interesting tv

New Pattern! Ancyra Cowl

Ancyra Cowl - a free knitting pattern on Knitty.com from Imagined Landscapes Designs

 

Published in Knitty, First Fall 2017 

 

When I first started seeing mini skeins, I resisted. How much of a difference could that one bit of yarn make? Then I started to wonder from a design perspective: how much difference could that mini make? What could I do to make the colour go as far as possible? What techniques would take the mini to the max?

I started flipping through stitch dictionaries, filling pages of my knitting notebook with scribbled notes and quick drawings. Suddenly I no longer wondered what to do with minis…I wondered how I was going to find time to knit all my ideas!

I love stripes, and I particularly love a strong diagonal stripe. It would take a mini skein and give it a huge impact on a cowl.

Mosaic stitch is another favourite element. It’s nearly as easy as garter, but with all the showiness of stranded colourwork. The trouble with mosaic stitch is that many of the motifs are large – wide stitch counts and needing lots of rows to complete. I wanted every pattern I developed for mini skeins to be something that had short row repeats so that it would be really easy for knitters to modify the pattern depending on their mini skein yardage or if they were using leftovers. Happily, the Miniature Mosaic pattern in Barbara Walker’s A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns caught my eye.

Ancyra - a free knitting pattern for a fingering weight cowl on Knitty.com from Imagined Landscapes

“The mosaic was super easy to complete even for someone who has never done mosaic knitting before (like me)!”

Marfi236 – test knitter

I started thinking of some of the mosaics I’ve seen in churches that use gold tiles and realized I had two fantastic yarns on hand: madelinetosh’s rich, deep teal in the Cousteau colourway and the luxurious amber-gold of the Glazed Pecan colourway.

Ancyra Cowl - a free knitting pattern on Knitty.com from Imagined Landscapes Designs

Yes, this does start with a provisional cast on and ends with grafting, but I promise you these two bits of extra care will be well rewarded as you look at the finished piece and can’t tell where the seam is. You’ll feel a real glow of satisfaction as friends try to figure out how you did the colour pattern on a diagonal and how you don’t seem to have a beginning or ending. Besides, grafting garter is even easier than grafting stockinette since you do the same thing on both the front and back needles!

 

If you like Ancyra, the +1 Pop Collection offers 7 more patterns in the same vein. It features a variety of accessory types including cowls, hats, and fingerless mitts – perfect for making coordinating sets or just playing with colours.

Link to free pattern on Knitty

Ancyra Cowl - a free knitting pattern on Knitty.com from Imagined Landscapes Designs

Tutorial: How to Combine Yarn Colours

Tips for Choosing Yarn Colours - a tutorial from Imagined Landscapes Designs

Wondering how to pick colours for your +1 Pop projects? Picking colours can be both the best part of a project and the most overwhelming part of a project. Happily there are ways to help you quickly and easily narrow down your possibilities…and get you a finished project you love.

This is also available as a PDF download. Click here.

Before I chose colours, I like to think about how I’m going to use the final result. I ask a series of questions like: Am I looking for something to match my jacket or am I do I want something to stand out as the focus of an outfit? (Download the free Yarn Substitutions Guide for help with this if you’re interested.)

Only once I know what vibe I’m going for, even if I’ve just narrowed it down to ‘graphic contrast colours’ or ‘quirky’ or ‘harmonious colours and feminine’, do I start to look at the actual colours.

There are no right or wrong colour combos, just ones that get you nearer or further from the look you want. Hopefully these two tips will make it easier for you to get the look you’re going for.

 

Tips for Choosing Yarn Colours - a tutorial from Imagined Landscapes Designs

Tip #1: Black and White 

Colour play really lives and dies by yarn shades. By this I mean the light and dark differences between your colours. Two versions of the same colour will have a lighter shade and a darker shade, and it is this contrast more than the colours themselves that makes colours pop or blend. This rhythm of light and dark can work with our colour choices or against them.

Our eyes and brains work pretty hard to fool us, though. Sometimes our minds just really want to see something as bright and light because of an emotional association we have with a colour, but it’s actually more of a middle shade. (I’m often fooled by greens for instance and think that there is  more contrast than there is.)

Have a look at the picture above. I’ve taken two photos and used a black and white filter on my cellphone camera. Taking colour out of the equation means that you can evaluate the combinations more objectively.

Sometimes a set of colours seems really bold and fantastic, but they’re too close in shade to make for a good design because they’re both calling for the same amount of attention. Having at least some variance between colours can make a difference.

The +1 Pop collection was designed with the idea of making the most of the contrast colour from the mini skein, but the patterns will definitely work with harmonious and subtle pairings. You just need to be aware that you’re headed for a different effect than in the original and you should test it out to be sure you like it. And that leads us to the second trick.

Trick #2: Yarn wrapping before swatching

Give those colours a trial run. Before you even swatch the combinations, you can get a good sense of how balanced things will look. Simply grab a book or a ruler and wrap the different yarns around it.

It’s a fast and easy way to look at the possibilities even before investing the effort of swatching them. This way you can easily eliminate some combinations. I recommend that you take the time to snap a picture of your wrapped yarns. I find it amazing how often I can spot a problem on a photo that I can’t see in the real thing right in front of me.

Tips for Choosing Yarn Colours - a tutorial from Imagined Landscapes Designs

Here is the picture of the wrapped yarns also put through the black and white filter. It’s really interesting to see the difference between the two versions. Which colour combination do you most prefer with the olive green colour I’ve used as a main colour? There’s no right or wrong answer. There are just different versions of an accessory that would make you more or less likely to wear the finished object and feel like a million bucks.

Do you have ways you navigate this world of colours? Leave a comment – I’m always interested in new ways to play with colour!